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NRA Rifle Silhouette - A steel shooting sport designed for the hunter
Steel targets and one of the most challenging rifle shooting sports in the world.
Freestanding Steel Targets and a Long Range Rifle Shooting Arcade

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The NRA Smallbore Rifle Silhouette Steel Targets

If you want to see these pictures at actual size DOWNLOAD the PDF file. View the files at 100% scale. There are 4 pages, one animal on each page.

THE CHICKENS are the smallest of the smallbore steel targets to shoot. They are about 2-5/8 inches from beak to tail. The steel on these, and all of the other smallbore rifle targets, are 1/4 inch thick. The main body is a little over 1 inch high. They are the closest targets at 40 meters (43.7 yards) from the firing line. They are the second easiest of the targets to hit. Because they are so close, and the velocity of the bullet is still high, they really fly off of the stand. It also makes it more difficult to spot the near misses. There is so much dirt flying around it can be hard to tell exactly where it hit, making it harder to make the proper adjustment.

THE PIGS are the largest smallbore steel targets relative to the distance from the firing line making them easiest targets to hit. They have a nice shape creating a good area to fire at. They are placed 60 meters (65.6 yards) from the firing line. It can be very frustrating to see the bullet hit the dirt through the hole between the legs. It can also be a relief as it spins off the stand because you got lucky and clipped the nose.

THE TURKEYS are the most difficult smallbore steel targets. They are placed 77 meters (84.2 yards) from the firing line. Their odd shape and small size relative to the distance make them a real challenge. They are at a distance where the wind is a serious factor as well. Not noticing a slight change in the wind speed or direction can be the reason for the next shot being off target. The Turkeys can be the place where you walk away with a big smile on your face no matter what else happens in the match or, a scene of frustration wondering what just happened.

THE RAMS are the largest smallbore steel targets and the farthest from the firing line. They set at 100 meters (109.4 yards) from the firing line. They are the second most difficult to hit. They are a little over 6 inches long from nose to tail but only about 2-1/2 inches high on the body. The steel on these, and all of the other smallbore rifle targets, are 1/4 inch thick. They are not very forgiving on an elevation error. The bullet has traveled a long time to get here. It has lost a lot of velocity and these heavier targets fall a lot more gracefully than all of the others. Although their shape makes them more forgiving on the windage, you will need it. By the time the bullet gets here a 5 MPH crosswind will have pushed the bullet completely off of the target. This is where the skill level in determining how much to adjust for the existing wind conditions can be extremely important.

NRA Smallbore Rifle Silhouette Metallic Ram Target


NRA Smallbore Rifle Silhouette Targets in a downloadable PDF file with Minutes of Angle overlay

This is a PDF image of the NRA steel target sizes with the Minutes of Angle depicted on them. If viewed or printed at 100% they will match the official NRA steel target size.


The NRA High Power Rifle Silhouette Steel Targets

THE CHICKENS are the smallest steel targets for High Power Rifle Silhouette. They are about 13-1/2 inches from beak to tail. The main body is 5-1/2 inches high. The steel on these are 1/2 inch thick and they weight about 10 pounds. They are the closest targets at 200 meters (219 yards) from the firing line. They are the second easiest of the targets to hit. A solid hit on these slam them into the ground at this close range.

THE PIGS are the largest high power rifle targets relative to the distance from the firing line making them easiest steel targets to hit. These are made 1/2 inch thick steel and weigh a hefty 30 pounds. They have a nice shape creating a good area to fire at. They are placed 300 meters (328 yards) from the firing line. They are 22 inches from nose to tail and an average body height of about 9-1/2 inches.

THE TURKEYS are placed 385 meters (421 yards) from the firing line. Their odd shape adds to the difficulty. They are 17 inches wide from the chest to the tip of the tail and the height is about 10 inches from the top of the back to the bottom of the belly. The steel on these targets are 3/8 inches thick and they weigh about 17 pounds. Being nearly a quarter of a mile away makes it a difficult steel target to hit. An incredible rifle shooting challenge.

THE RAMS are set at 500 meters (547 yards) from the firing line. The Rams are the largest of all of the steel targets. They are the second most difficult target to hit. They are 32 inches long from nose to tail and have a body height of about 12-1/2 inches. These are made of 3/8 inch thick steel and weigh 50 pounds. A weak bullet strike on this and it is not going anywhere. They have a narrow height and are not forgiving on an elevation error. Their shape makes them more forgiving on the windage and you will need it. By the time the bullet gets here a 5 MPH crosswind can push the bullet completely off of the target. Skill in determining how much to adjust for the existing wind conditions is a big factor in knocking this heavy steel target down.

NRA High Power Rifle Silhouette Metallic Ram Target

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